the Schedule 2017

    × the schedule 2017
  • Monday, June 26th
  • Tuesday, June 27th
  • Wednesday, June 28th
  • Thursday, June 29th
Monday, June 26th
VIEW MORE DETAILS
DAYTIME
9am—5pm:
Workshops
9am—5pm:
Code+Resistance Summit
9am
SKYLINE ROOM
MONDAY, JUNE 26th • 9:00AM • WALKER ART CENTER – SKYLINE ROOM

This workshop introduces the theory and application of machine learning for creative and artistic practice. It will focus on core algorithms used for parsing, visualizing, and discovering patterns in complex multimedia data, including images, sounds, and text. We will learn how to use neural networks to create real-time, cross-modal interactions for use in video and installation, as well as live music performance. We will also provide tools and code for clustering, visualizing, and searching through large collections of multimedia.

SKILL LEVEL: Intermediate

WORKSHOP OVERVIEW:
• Intro to machine learning, and a survey of critical issues demonstrating its relevance.
• Science and theory: how neural networks are designed, how they are trained, and what their low-level applications are.
• High-level applications to artistic and creative practice within design, visual art, sound, and physical computing.

WHAT TO BRING:
A laptop, Mac/Windows/Linux.
Any interactive sensors they wish to bring are welcome, e.g. Kinect, Leap Motion, BrainWave scanner, Myo armband, etc.

WHAT SOFTWARE TO HAVE INSTALLED:
Processing openFrameworks Wekinator
*Artists and musicians who use any software should come with it prepared: AbletonLive, AudioUnits, other DAWs, Resolume, VDMX, etc. People with an interest in physical computing may bring Arduinos or other microcontrollers.

NOTES:
Prior coding experience in a text-based (Python, Java/Processing, C++/openFrameworks) or patch-based (Max/MSP, PureData, vvvv) programming environment is helpful but not necessary.
Francis Tseng: Francis is a designer and software engineer interested in simulation, machine learning, games, and utopia/politics. He’s worked on news automation software and developed community analysis infrastructure. He’s presently a Researcher-in-Residence at NEW INC and recently released The Founder: A Dystopian Business Simulator.
Gene Kogan: Gene is an artist and programmer interested in generative systems, artificial intelligence, and software for creativity and self-expression. He initiated and contributes to ml4a, a free book about machine learning for artists, activists, and citizen scientists.
Francis Tseng
Gene Kogan
– or –
GARDEN TERRACE ROOM
MONDAY, JUNE 26th • 9:00AM • WALKER ART CENTER – GARDEN TERRACE ROOM

The workshop encompasses the idea of intersecting science and art through e-textiles and wearables, by creating handmade technological artifacts that can sense electromagnetic fields. After a brief presentation of reference projects and technologies that would be used, the participants will experiment with two different circuits. One acts as an amplifier that can pick up LF transmissions and make them audible. And the other, an ATtiny85-based detector, provides sonic, haptic and visual feedback of the picked-up interference. Furthermore, the participants will explore the concept of fractal antennas and will create their custom wearable EMF detectors.

Electromagnetic fields are everywhere and this workshop provides the basic tools for sensing the invisible universe that surrounds us by providing sonic, haptic and visual feedback on our bodies. The wearable detectors that will be produced at the workshop can be used in a number of ways – as an open-source tool to explore the city’s invisible landscape, as an audiovisual performance interface or as a way to collect EMF data that can afterwards be used for further analysis and experiments (e.g. visualisation or signification). Plus, according to Nicolas Collins in his hardware hacking bible Handmade Electronic Music: “If you get far enough from civilisation’s ubiquitous 60/50 Hz hum, you may be able to pick up the Aurora Borealis, “whistlers” induced by meteorites self-immolating as they enter the earth’s atmosphere, the pipping of GPS satellites, or top-secret submarine radio communication.”

SKILL LEVEL: Intro/Intermediate

WORKSHOP OVERVIEW:
• Intro to EMFs, fractal antennas, reference projects.
• Intro to the materials that will be used.
• Hands-on prototyping: mounting/soldering textile circuits.
• Programming the ATtiny85.
• Testing the wearable detectors (indoors and outdoors).


WHAT TO BRING:
Laptop
Headphones
Tiny AVR programmer (if you have one)
A piece of clothing you would like to hack.


WHAT SOFTWARE TO HAVE INSTALLED:
Arduino (version 1.6.x or higher)
ATtiny boards (version 1.0.1 or 1.0.2) by David A. Mellis – can be installed from the Boards Manager in Arduino.


NOTES:
It will certainly helpful to be familiar with Arduino coding and to have soldering and/or crafting skills. However they are not necessary prerequisites.



Afroditi Psarra: Afroditi’s artistic interest focuses on the body as an interface, contemporary handicrafts, folk tradition, pop iconography, retrofuturistic aesthetics and the role of women in contemporary culture. Her work extends from soft circuits, hacking and coding, to interactive installations and sound performances.
Afroditi Psarra
– or –
ARTLAB
MONDAY, JUNE 26th • 9:00AM • WALKER ART CENTER – ARTLAB

This workshop is for artists and creative technologists who are interested in teaching or improve their teaching practice. A good teacher is also a great student themselves. They transform their curiosity into knowledge and share their learning process with others. One can learn to become a better teacher by staying fearless about ‘not knowing’ something, embracing radically open ideas and connecting various expertise and knowledge. Teaching can be a form of artistic and social practice in collaboration with a diverse community. This workshop will introduce new forms of learning spaces such as artist-run schools and activist organizations.

Participants will learn about the history of alternative art schools, artist experiments in and out of academic institutions, Bauhaus, Black Mountain College as well as more recent experiments. The instructor will share his teaching and organizing experience at the School for Poetic Computation. Participants will engage in hands-on workshop and critical discussion about curriculum, syllabus and pedagogy. After the workshop, participants will become knowledgeable about various ways of teaching and create a syllabus of their own.



SKILL LEVEL: Intro

WORKSHOP OVERVIEW:
• Lecture: Introduction to alternative education • Activity: My learning history (personal mind mapping) • Lecture: What is curriculum? Artists as educators, performance art work as curriculum • Activity: Performance workshop • Lecture: Artists in schools, public institutions, galleries, museums, biennales. Accessibilities and diversity in learning environment. • Activity: Unlearning workshop

WHAT TO BRING:
No computer needed. Participants will engage in physical activities: movement and performance activities. If you need assistance or special needs, please let us know.

WHAT TO PREPARE:
No technical requirements needed. Instructor will share reading list two weeks prior to workshop.

Taeyoon Choi: Taeyoon is an artist, educator and activist based in New York and Seoul. His art practice involves performance, electronics, drawings that often leads to storytelling in public spaces. He’s also the co-founder of School for Poetic Computation.
Taeyoon Choi
– or –
HELD AT INTERMEDIA ARTS CENTER 2822 LYNDALE AVENUE SOUTH MINNEAPOLIS, MN 55408 (612) 871-4444

In a time of executive orders and alternative facts, how can coders, technologists and artists find a meaningful voice? How can we learn from the work of long-time activists and organizers, and support their work on the ground? Can we move beyond tech solutionism? How does a community dominated by young white men embrace intersectionality?

In this one-day summit, we’ll try to answer these questions and draw a path forward for effective, inclusive resistance. Structured as an ‘un-conference’, code+resistance provides a forum for every attendee to lead discussions, present work, teach workshops and devise new models for collaboration.
EVENING
7pm—12am:
Eyeo Kick Off Event
7pm
The Eyeo Festival officially kicks off Monday night with keynotes and cocktails.
8pm
GUTHRIE THEATER
An array of ideas about creative technology.
Jennifer Daniel: Jennifer has been acclaimed for her conceptual, clever, and content-driven approach to illustration and writing. She manages to combine the difficult beasts of quality and variety, making infographics for Bloomberg, children’s books about space and drawing hot dogs jumping into swimming pools.
Jennifer Daniel
9pm
Attendees take the stage to present five-minute talks on subjects ranging from dating-data to true color to trash to anxiety. Slides auto-advance every 15 seconds. Can they keep up? It’s always entertaining and enlightening. (The submission period is over; selectees have been notified. Wish them luck.)
Tuesday, June 27th
VIEW MORE DETAILS
DAYTIME
10am—5pm:
Talks at the Walker
10am
WALKER CINEMA
Architecture and design have much to teach us in an increasingly sentient and intelligent world. As it turns out, we’ve been learning those lessons for a long time. In this talk, Molly Wright Steenson looks back to look forward—to the origins of artificial intelligence and cybernetics and its collaborations with designers and architects starting in the 1950s, and the ways that those projects illuminated our ideas about interactivity today.

This nexus of technology, architecture, and design has captivated Molly for over a decade and is the subject of her forthcoming book Architectural Intelligence: How Designers and Architects Created the Digital Landscape (MIT Press). A Minneapolis native who used to live across Loring Park from the Walker Art Center, she is proudly copping the title of this talk from one of her favorite Hüsker Dü songs.

TUESDAY, JUNE 27th • 10:00AM • WALKER CINEMA
Molly Wright Steenson: Molly is a design, architecture, and media scholar. She’s an associate professor at Carnegie Mellon’s School of Design, where she continues to study how technology and interactivity fit into our contemporary cities and lives. She’s worked as a designer, design researcher, strategist and geek since 1994.
Molly Wright Steenson
– or –
McGUIRE THEATER
A decade of data collection and visualization has given Nicholas a unique point of view. His experience with the Annual Report series has also fueled the development of several digital products, each with differing degrees of success. In this new talk, Nicholas reflects on what has worked and what has not as he attempts to incorporate these lessons into a new tool.

TUESDAY, JUNE 27th • 10:00AM • McGUIRE THEATER
Nicholas Felton: Nicholas is a designer, entrepreneur and artist whose work focuses on translating quotidian data into meaningful objects and experiences. His annual personal Feltron Reports are legend– they condense the events of a year into a tapestry of maps, graphs and statistics.
Nicholas Felton
11:05am
McGUIRE THEATER
What if the structure of information reveals more than the information itself? What if the most crucial aspect of a dataset is the moment before it becomes one? This talk is about the messy spaces between categorization and collection, as explored through a series of projects that aim to reveal the ways in which we are being and have always been abstracted, represented, classified, and forgotten.

TUESDAY, JUNE 27th • 11:05AM • McGUIRE THEATER
Mimi Onuoha: Mimi is a Brooklyn-based artist and researcher examining the implications of data collection and computational categorization. Her work uses code, writing, and sculptures to explore missing data and the ways in which people are abstracted, represented, and classified.
Mimi Onuoha
– or –
WALKER CINEMA
I love music and coding. Coding lets you see music in new ways, and explore fun questions. How does music really work? What might the music of Bach or Debussy look like? What if you could turn anything into music – even a subway map? I’ve been able to explore these ideas through personal projects and my work at Google Creative Lab. I’m excited to share what I’ve learned and play with some live demos together.

TUESDAY, JUNE 27th • 11:05AM • WALKER CINEMA
Alexander Chen: Alexander is a Creative Director at Google Creative Lab. In 2011, he launched MTA.ME, which transformed a New York subway map into a string instrument. This personal work led to the conception of the Les Paul Doodle, a Google doodle which generated 5.1 years worth of shared music around the world.
Alexander Chen
11:50am
Grab a bite on site and see short presentations by your fellow attendees, or head out and find a meal at one of the many great options Minneapolis has to offer.
1:20pm
WALKER CINEMA
Network and communications infrastructures play multiple roles in our lives everyday, some of which we are consciously manipulating while others are hidden from sight. The data traveling through these systems tell compelling stories if you know how to look for them. They also often reflect systemic biases and prejudices that are prevalent in society. In this talk we will do an overview of the technical landscape and go through real world examples of how infrastructure can be used as a journalistic source and also as source material for critical art. This talk will most likely appeal to those interested in data journalism, radios, critical engineering and algorithmic discrimination and bias.

TUESDAY, JUNE 27th • 1:20PM • WALKER CINEMA
Surya Mattu: Surya has been investigating how our wireless devices leak data and the impact that has on us. He’s also been working on Machine Bias, a series that aims to highlight how algorithmic systems can be biased and discriminate against people.
Surya Mattu
– or –
McGUIRE THEATER
Speculative Design creates props for other timelines, parallel or future. It uses the language of design to shift us into another reality via objects and devices that aren’t born of the status quo, or of our own time or place. In this talk, Sands will explore how, using design, art, and media, we can embody ideas and worlds in objects, and look critically at our assumptions about how our world has to be. He will detail his work at the MIT Media Lab building provocative police futures to question who participates in this design space, and how we might create more humane alternatives.

TUESDAY, JUNE 27th • 1:20PM • McGUIRE THEATER
Sands Fish: Sands is an artist and researcher at the MIT Media Lab’s Civic Media group. His current work uses speculative design to help communities imagine and advocate for more desirable futures.
Sands Fish
2:25pm
WALKER CINEMA
The natural and the human-made have mostly been distinct–we can usually tell them apart at a glance. But over the last century or so, cutting-edge architecture (like museums and corporate headquarters) has gradually transformed from rectilinear and repetitive modernism, to organic and random. While cultural factors no doubt play a part, this aesthetic progression can be linked to the rise of computing technologies for stress analysis, design, and fabrication. Meanwhile, inside each of us, our bones have been doing this all along: bone cells sense mechanical load and create complex, organic geometries that change over time in response to how we use our bodies. But today, the coupling of evolutionary algorithms with 3D printing means our synthetic systems are starting to converge on the capacities of these biological systems. One day, human-made buildings and structures might be able to grow and change in response to use in the same way that our bones, blood vessels, and other biological systems do.

TUESDAY, JUNE 27th • 2:25PM • WALKER CINEMA
Deb Chachra: Deb is an associate professor at the Olin College of Engineering. She researches the engineering student experience and works to make it better. She teaches materials science and engineering design, and also facilitates workshops around gender and technology.
Deb Chachra
– or –
McGUIRE THEATER
Learn how to use data, design, and technology to fight police violence, resist oppressive systems, and build a world in which black lives matter.

TUESDAY, JUNE 27th • 2:25PM • McGUIRE THEATER
Sam Sinyangwe: Sam is a data scientist and policy analyst who works with communities of color to fight systemic racism through cutting-edge policies and strategies. He is a co-founder of Mapping Police Violence, a database of police killings in the United States, and Campaign Zero, a policy platform to end police violence.
Sam Sinyangwe
3:30pm
McGUIRE THEATER
Last year, faced with the prospect of turning 40, feeling a bit burnt out with the media arts field, I decided to radically change the way I work. In this talk I will discuss some of the patterns of creative behavior I explored, such as daily sketching and having regular office hours, as well the patterns I started to see in my own work and the works of others. While this discussion sounds really personal, in the talk I will link out heavily to other artists and designers whose work I find inspiring and challenging (lots of footnotes! bring a pen!). In addition to discussing my own process, I have interviewed a number of people who have interesting methodologies for their creative practice and I’ll be discussing some of the things I’ve learned from talking to them.

TUESDAY, JUNE 27th • 3:30PM • McGUIRE THEATER
Zach Lieberman: Zach is an artist with a simple goal: he wants you surprised. His work uses technology in a playful way to break down the fragile boundary between the visible and the invisible. He’s a co-creator of openFrameworks, and co-founder of the School for Poetic Computation.
Zach Lieberman
– or –
WALKER CINEMA
The McCoy’s look up from their nuclear family to discuss the American story, charting the path from The Little House on the Prairie to Trump Tower. “Today we demonstrate ways to make people say yes to your messaging and your management. This is science- from scientific studies.” How do we negotiate the cultural and personal implications of our choices?

TUESDAY, JUNE 27th • 3:30PM • WALKER CINEMA
Jennifer McCoy: Jennifer, with her partner Kevin, works with interactive media, film, performance and installation to explore personal experience in relation with new technology, the mass media, and global commerce. They often re-examine classic genres and works of cinema, science fiction or television narrative, creating sculptural objects, net art, robotic movies or live performance.
Kevin McCoy: Kevin, with his partner Jennifer, works with interactive media, film, performance and installation to explore personal experience in relation with new technology, the mass media, and global commerce. They often re-examine classic genres and works of cinema, science fiction or television narrative, creating sculptural objects, net art, robotic movies or live performance.
Jennifer McCoy
Kevin McCoy
EVENING
7pm—12am:
Evening Keynotes
7:15pm
2 Keynotes at a lovely evening venue.
8pm
ARIA
I will talk about the use of digital technologies and activism, digital colonialism, Monstrosity, and re-figuring as it relates to both the process of making a previous project called Material Speculation: ISIS and its aftermath as well as a new in progress project called “She Who Sees The Unknown”. I want to reflect on and contextualize that asks difficult questions and suggests alternative methods.

TUESDAY, JUNE 27th • 8:00PM • ARIA
Morehshin Allahyari
9pm
ARIA
Joanie’s work focuses on the use of light in space and its relationship to our perception of reality. The subjects he depicts range from minimal geometries to organic landscapes. Hiking and exploring nature are paramount to his creative process; the forests, deserts, valleys and mountains that emerge in many of his projects bearing witness to passion. He’ll share some of his most beautiful holiday pictures, as well as images that directly inform his studio research.

TUESDAY, JUNE 27th • 9:00PM • ARIA
Joanie Lemercier: Joanie is a French artist primarily focused on projections of light in space and its influence on our perception. Since 2006, his live projection performances, stage design work and installations have been seen around the world. He’s interested in physical structures: geometry, patterns, and minimalist forms and the physics and philosophy of how light can be used to manipulate perceived reality.
Joanie Lemercier
Wednesday, June 28th
VIEW MORE DETAILS
DAYTIME
10am—5pm:
Talks at the Walker
10am
McGUIRE THEATER
Text and photos and video and maps and data visualization and interactives and gifs: journalism on the web takes many forms. But is there an ideal way to tell every story?

With examples from the New York Times graphics department I’ll show how some stories demand certain forms, and how using different forms for what they’re best at can create journalism that is more than the sum of its parts.

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 28th • 10:00AM • McGUIRE THEATER
Derek Watkins: Derek is a Graphics Editor at The New York Times. He covers many topics, but is most interested in how geography influences people’s lives and their interactions with the environment
Derek Watkins
– or –
WALKER CINEMA
As an artist, I work with technology and narrative – formal and relational projects. As an activist, I examine personal and political – practice and praxis. As an educator, I create feedback between plastic and elastic – learning and unlearning. My talk is set at the dawn. We are waiting for the sun to rise and we are full of questions. What’s the role of an artist as an activist now? How can we critique oppressive systems that create the sense of ‘others’ based on ability and legal status? What’s kind of pedagogy can we experiment through alternative schools? How can we create a community among those who have nothing in common? By creating art, we can give form to our intentions, contribute to making the world we want to live in.

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 28th • 10:00AM • WALKER CINEMA
Taeyoon Choi: Taeyoon is an artist, educator and activist based in New York and Seoul. His art practice involves performance, electronics, drawings that often leads to storytelling in public spaces. He’s also the co-founder of School for Poetic Computation.
Taeyoon Choi
11:05am
WALKER CINEMA
Technology allows us new tools to build a better more inclusive future but without an acknowledgement of past and ingrained biases are we doomed to fail? Due to the recent US election & the rise of white supremacist populist movements in Europe, digital security and safety information is in high demand. But, are we leaving behind those directly affected in our rush to a ‘safer’ future? I’ll talk about my research and some possible solutions.

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 28th • 11:05AM • WALKER CINEMA
Matt Mitchell: Matt trains activists & journalists in digital security. His work focuses on marginalized, aggressively monitored, over-policed populations in the United States.
Matt Mitchell
– or –
McGUIRE THEATER
Join Manuel Lima for a fascinating tour through millennia of circular information design in architecture, urban planning, fine art, design, fashion, technology, religion, cartography, biology, astronomy and physics in a visual feast for infographics enthusiasts. From Venn diagrams and early celestial charts to the trefoil biohazard symbol and Target’s corporate logo, Lima provides a history of humanity’s long-lasting obsession with all things circular and a unique taxonomy of the many varieties of circle diagrams.

Tied with the publication of Lima’s latest “The Book of Circles”, there will also be a book signing session at 4:15 PM by the Walker’s Little Store.

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 28th • 11:05AM • McGUIRE THEATER
Manuel Lima: Manuel studies how information can be organized — into elegant and beautiful diagrams that illustrate the many unexpected twists of data. His website, visual complexity, and many books are essential reference points for data visualizers worldwide.
Manuel Lima
11:50am
Grab a bite on site and see short presentations by your fellow attendees, or head out and find a meal at one of the many great options Minneapolis has to offer.
1:20pm
McGUIRE THEATER
I’ll explore the intersection of code and choreography. Through programming languages, generative performance scores, live coding and machine learning I find technological approaches to making dance that explore new tools for making, and challenging, roles within the choreographic process.

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 28th • 1:20PM • McGUIRE THEATER
Kate Sicchio: Kate is a choreographer, media artist and performer whose work explores the interface between choreography and technology. Recently she’s been working with wearable technology and live coding as an intervention in the choreographic process.
Kate Sicchio
– or –
WALKER CINEMA
Complex Movements will share insights from their project Beware of the Dandelions which is a mobile art installation that functions as a multimedia performance, a community organizing process, and oral history video archive. The piece intersects disciplines including: community organizing, design, hip-hop and electronic music, architecture, and theater. Complex Movements engages communities to expand their strategies for organizing around local and trans-local social justice issues.

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 28th • 1:20PM • WALKER CINEMA
Invincible/ill Weaver: Invincible/ill Weaver is a Detroit based lyricist, performance artist, and activist. Invincible is also a member of Complex Movements, a Detroit-based artist collective supporting the transformation of communities by exploring the connections of complex science and social justice movements through multimedia interactive performance work.
L05: L05 (Carlos) is an artist, performer, designer, and engineer. He performs and exhibits work as part of Complex Movements, a Detroit-based artist collective supporting the transformation of communities by exploring the connections of complex science and social justice movements through multimedia interactive performance work.
Sage Crump: Sage is a producer and cultural strategist. She’s a part of Complex Movements, a Detroit-based artist collective supporting the transformation of communities by exploring the connections of complex science and social justice movements through multimedia interactive performance work.
Wesley Taylor: Wesley is a graphic designer, fine artist, musician and curator. He is co-founder of Emergence Media, and a member of Complex Movements. His most recent body of work revolves around the promise of the future; he imagines that “the future” is his client and he is in charge of marketing for “the future” and branding its many possibilities.
Invincible/ill Weaver
L05
Sage Crump
Wesley Taylor
2:25pm
WALKER CINEMA
Millennials are special, and so has the be the way we interact with them through storytelling. A journey that shows an inspirational path into finding ways to bring people to conversations using interactive storytelling getting people informed and engaged in society. From the Guardian to Fusion, with Chicas Poderosas in the mix.



WEDNESDAY, JUNE 28th • 2:25PM • WALKER CINEMA
Mariana Santos: Mariana is a visual storyteller, who did groundbreaking work as a member of the interactive team at The Guardian in London. Since then she’s co-founded Unicorn Interactive, and Chicas Poderosas, a digital training community which brings women journalists to technology in media.
Mariana Santos
– or –
McGUIRE THEATER
A tutorial on how to make no money from machine learning. This talk will elaborate on the strategies one must master in order to acquire skills from the most lucrative subfield of computer science to emerge in recent years, and subsequently make the most financially suboptimal use of them possible. By concentrating your efforts on making free software for exploring applications of AI to visual art, then freely sharing your process with the public, you too can squander your earning potential in this booming field.

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 28th • 2:25PM • McGUIRE THEATER
Gene Kogan: Gene is an artist and programmer interested in generative systems, artificial intelligence, and software for creativity and self-expression. He initiated and contributes to ml4a, a free book about machine learning for artists, activists, and citizen scientists.
Gene Kogan
3:30pm
Description coming soon…
– or –
McGUIRE THEATER
A talk about the other billions of inhabitants in your local metropolis, the one you can’t see, who affect your life and wellbeing, and many of whom don’t even have names. The ones who cannot be deported, the ones who will be here long after we are gone. A talk about how to see them, and some initial thoughts on how to show them to others.
Kevin Slavin: Kevin is the Chief Science and Technology Officer for the Shed, a new cultural institution being built in NYC (opening April 2019.) He was faculty and founder of the Playful Systems Group at the MIT Media Lab, where he remains a Research Affiliate, and has been a serial entrepreneur in the intersections of entertainment, games, data, and design.
Kevin Slavin
EVENING
8pm—12am:
Eyeo Party
8pm
Let’s take the night off from lectures, but keep the conversations going. We’re planning a fun party at a fun place. Details on the way…
Thursday, June 29th
VIEW MORE DETAILS
DAYTIME
10am—5pm:
Talks at the Walker
10:30am
WALKER CINEMA
Jason will discuss a range of computationally-engaged artworks from the last two decades. Exploring content ranging from Playboy Centerfolds to procedural Abstract Expressionist painting to the entirety of the Wikipedia, the talk will close with a discussion of recent large-scale generative and deep learning projects.

THURSDAY, JUNE 29th • 10:30AM • WALKER CINEMA
Jason Salavon: Jason uses software processes of his own design, generating and reconfiguring masses of communal material to present new perspectives on the familiar.
Jason Salavon
– or –
McGUIRE THEATER
Ubiquitous computing, the Maker movement and the Craft Revival gave rise to a generation of e-textiles practitioners coming from different fields (art, design, engineering, physics etc) that explore art and science by experimenting with wearable technologies. Can the idea of hacking the body trigger new scientific research or tactical methods of resistance? Could e-textiles be used as an educational tool to raise awareness towards the massive production and consumption of technology?

THURSDAY, JUNE 29th • 10:30AM • McGUIRE THEATER
Afroditi Psarra: Afroditi’s artistic interest focuses on the body as an interface, contemporary handicrafts, folk tradition, pop iconography, retrofuturistic aesthetics and the role of women in contemporary culture. Her work extends from soft circuits, hacking and coding, to interactive installations and sound performances.
Afroditi Psarra
11:35am
McGUIRE THEATER
There is no question Virtual Reality as a medium is still in its infancy. But even in the past couple of years, creators have been experimenting in the space and challenging what VR can be.

In this talk, we’ll explore the new types of content and experiences emerging from the space: from cinematic 360 videos, to WebVR, to site specific performance based installations, up to interactive, multi-player journeys. We’ll dig into the current limitations of VR – from both a creation and distribution standpoint – with an eye toward the possibilities and incredible potential of the technology.

THURSDAY, JUNE 29th • 11:35AM • McGUIRE THEATER
Jess Engel: Jess is the Director of Original Content at Within, a technology and media company whose mission is to help evolve VR as a new medium for experiential storytelling. She is currently developing an array of pioneering VR experiences with top creators across music, film, animation, and interactive.
Jess Engel
– or –
WALKER CINEMA
Data visualization is about re-representing the real world through data; abstracting the complex and incomprehensible. On the other hand a big part of my work is about generative systems and computer graphics where we go in the opposite direction. We start with the basic primitives: points, lines, triangles; and combine them together with more and more sophisticated rendering algorithms in order to mimic the reality.

This talk explores that contrast and how it influences my work at Variable studio while moving fluently between both ends of the spectrum constantly changing levels of abstraction. Does data have a shape? Or is it a place we can visit? Is data art just a gimmick? What are the risks of reducing a person to just a data point? And more…

THURSDAY, JUNE 29th • 11:35AM • WALKER CINEMA
Marcin Ignac: Marcin specializes in data visualization and computational design. He finds beauty and inspiration in structures of biological organisms, patterns emerging from data, and the complexity of computer algorithms. His studio, Variable.io, is based in London.
Marcin Ignac
12:20am
Grab a bite on site and see short presentations by your fellow attendees, or head out and find a meal at one of the many great options Minneapolis has to offer.
1:50pm
WALKER CINEMA
This is me, my hair, my lip, my smell, the way my head moves and the body I live in. The sense of self is not fixed but continuously updates in response to the present information. When the body senses itself internally and localizes its actions, it provides the basis for a material sense of self existence. At the same time, our mind registers the sense of an agency with free will, the sense of being the cause of voluntary action. Present self continuously becomes the past, and by the time we look into it we are in another present, consumed with planning the future. In this talk, I will discuss my work that alters the perception of self, through multi-sensory stimulation and induced interceptive experiences.

THURSDAY, JUNE 29th • 2:55PM • WALKER CINEMA
Xin Liu: Xin (刘昕) is a media artist, engineer and researcher (currently at the Fluid Interfaces Group at the MIT Media Lab). She mixes scientific research with personal narratives and creates transformative, participatory experiences and bodily objects.
Xin Liu
– or –
McGUIRE THEATER
Language models built with recurrent neural networks are advancing the state of the art on what feels like a weekly basis; off-the-shelf code is capable of astonishing mimicry and composition. What happens, though, when we take those models off the command line and put them into an interactive writing environment? I’ll present demos of several tools, including one presented here for the first time. I’ll discuss my motivations and process, share some technical tips, propose a course for the future — and along the way, we’ll write at least one short story together: all of us, and the machine.

THURSDAY, JUNE 29th • 1:50PM • McGUIRE THEATER
Robin Sloan: Robin has spent the past decade tinkering on the cutting edge of digital culture. He’s the author of Mr. Penumbra’s 24-Hour Bookstore, which grew from web post into a New York Times Best Seller published in more than twenty countries.
Robin Sloan
2:55pm
McGUIRE THEATER
Our biological existence, our ability to communicate, to exchange goods and values, are guaranteed by numerous invisible networks, from the protein and genetic networks in our cells to the world wide web, Internet and financial and trade networks. In the past decade, these networks are increasingly visible to us– mapped out by both scientists and artists. As I will illustrate in this talk, the emergence of most networks are governed by simple universal laws, that result in architectural features that make different, apparently unrelated networks much more similar to each other than one would expect.

THURSDAY, JUNE 29th • 2:55PM • McGUIRE THEATER
Albert-László Barabási: Albert-László Barabási studies networks, all kinds of networks, from biological systems to the internet, and everything in between. He’s authored several books on the subject including ”Network Science” (2016) “Bursts: The Hidden Pattern Behind Everything We Do” (2010). He’s Professor of Network Science at Northeastern University, where he directs the Center for Complex Network Research.
Albert-László Barabási
– or –
WALKER CINEMA
SMELL = information
a tool for communication – navigation – education – decision making –
WHAT COULD HAPPEN WHEN INVISIBLE INFORMATION – SMELL MOLECULES – IS THE STARTING POINT OF ACTING, REACTING…COMMUNICATING?
I believe that smells are a VERY crucial component in the definition, understanding of and orientation to an environment. Smells surround us all the time. We breathe 23,040 times a day and move 12.5 cubic meters of air and with every breath smell molecules flood through our bodies. Even when we sleep we smell. We live in a world of total antisepsis and a continuous wholesale deodorization, and it match a worldwide homogeneity of faceless glass buildings. Because all environmental smells cannot be pleasant, the consequences could be, we will have non at all!
OR, we want to change?
Historical, sociological and religious reasons have pulled the contemporary human being into almost ignoring more than 1 % of his genes! ONLY education can revive these hidden capacities, since the hardware and software still function in the healthy human being, but only if consciously trained and used. There is a whole word to educate and a whole world to smell! © Sissel Tolaas

THURSDAY, JUNE 29th • 2:55PM • WALKER CINEMA
Sissel Tolaas: Sissel is a Norwegian artist who lives in Berlin. She studied mathematics, chemistry and visual arts. Since 1990 she has concentrated on the language and communication of smell, focusing particularly on the concept of capturing the essence of a city or a place. She maintains a “smell archive” of more than 7000 airtight jars.
Sissel Tolaas
7:15pm
CLOSING TALKS & PARTY @ NICOLLET ISLAND PAVILION
EVENING
7:30pm—12am:
Closing Talks + Party
8pm
NICOLLET ISLAND PAVILION
Decades before the advent of social media as we know it, Gilles Deleuze observed that it was “a relief to have nothing to say, the right to say nothing, because only then is there a chance of framing the rare, and ever rarer, thing that might be worth saying.” Nothing has become more precious, in today’s economy of attention, than nothing. This talk will cover various instances of nothing from art history and contemporary projects, arguing that the cultivation of nothing has new salience in the age of everything.

THURSDAY, JUNE 29th • 8:00PM • NICOLLET ISLAND PAVILION
Jenny Odell: Jenny’s work combines the mining of online imagery with writing and research, usually in an attempt to highlight the material nature of our modern networked existence. Most recently she designed a gigantic mural for the Google data center in Oklahoma. She would spend 80% of her life in a library if she could.
Jenny Odell
9pm
NICOLLET ISLAND PAVILION
Steve Lambert wants you to join him. Lambert has worked alongside artists and activists in 15 countries on 4 continents helping them to effect power. With training in art and design, he uses signs, symbols, stories, and spectacle to engage new audiences on difficult topics through the social science of comedy, games, theater, and democracy. He’ll relay lessons learned in collaborating with larger advocacy organizations so you can better contribute to movements for justice, equality, public health, and human rights.

THURSDAY, JUNE 29th • 9:00PM • NICOLLET ISLAND PAVILION
Steve Lambert: Steve’s father, a former Franciscan monk, and mother, an ex-Dominican nun, imbued the values of dedication, study, poverty, and service to others – qualities which prepared him for life as an artist.
Steve Lambert